Student Speakers at various Conferences 2015-16

Alden Daniel

PhD Graduate Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: SPE

Talk Title: 

coming soon

Abstract: 

coming soon

Biography:

Alden's research interest focuses on flow assurance and energy production. Currently he is investigating the effects of gas evolution on compact subsea separation. His previous research topics include: wax mitigation for industrial processes, rheology of colloidal particles, and biomass conversion via enzymatic hydrolysis. Alden graduated from Florida State University with a BS in Chemical Engineering.

 

 

Ashwin Kumar Yegya Raman

PhD Graduate Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: AICHE, Salt Lake, Utah

Talk Titles:

(1) Investigating Emulsion Stability and the Impact of Surfactant Type on Transient Emulsion Behavior Using Diffusion Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques

(2) The Impact of Shear and Solid Stabilizers on Cyclopentane Hydrate Formation in Emulsions

(3) Prediction of the Impact of Water Fraction on Emulsion Behavior Using Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) Modeling

(4) Introduction to Gas Hydrate Formation and Mitigation

 

Talk Abstracts:

1) Investigating Emulsion Stability and the Impact of Surfactant Type on Transient Emulsion Behavior Using Diffusion Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques

Emulsions are ubiquitous in nature and industry. Fundamental understanding of these dynamic systems is critical to manage industrial processes such as those found in the energy and biofuels industries. Despite the relevance and history of emulsions, significant understanding is still lacking for concentrated emulsions, especially for those formed using solids as surfactants. This work utilizes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to bridge some of these gaps for concentrated emulsions. A series of experiments are presented for model oils and well characterized surfactants and solids in order to elucidate the impact of stabilizer type on dynamic emulsion behavior. A particular focus of the presentation is on the impact of silica and carbon nanotube stabilizers on dynamic emulsion behavior. The impact of water fraction on emulsion stability and droplet size distributions is also discussed. The diffusion NMR data provide insight about both the speciation and diffusion characteristics of the emulsions investigated.

2) The Impact of Shear and Solid Stabilizers on Cyclopentane Hydrate Formation in Emulsions

Hydrates are of great importance in the oil and gas industry due to their ability to plug pipelines, thereby leading to significant costs involved with managing and mitigating associated flow assurance issues. Along with naturally occurring surfactants, a wide variety of solid particles are typically present in crude oil. The impact of these solids on hydrate formation must be properly understood in order to develop effective flow assurance management strategies. The lack of fundamental understanding of hydrate formation mechanisms in emulsions has motivated the current work focused on hydrate forming emulsions stabilized using both conventional surfactants and solid particles. The objective of this work is to provide insight into hydrate formation in emulsions by quantifying droplet and hydrate particle size using optical microscopy. For this work, an Olympus BX53 polarized optical microscope with shear cell and temperature control stage (-50°C to 450°C) is used to quantify droplet size distributions and hydrate particle morphology. Cyclopentane hydrate formation is quantified in model oil systems stabilized using both solid particles and conventional surfactants. The concentrations of the dispersed phase and the surfactant are varied to evaluate their effect on hydrate formation and emulsion behavior.

Not presenting but author

3) Prediction of the Impact of Water Fraction on Emulsion Behavior Using Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) Modeling

Predicting emulsion behavior and transient properties is critical for several industrial applications, particularly in the energy and biofuels industries. The complex and dynamic nature of these systems make their computational prediction using conventional methodologies difficult. Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) modeling, however, is a robust framework which can be applied to predict emulsion behavior and account for the complexities that arise in these systems. This work utilizes QSPR to specifically incorporate the impact of water fraction on emulsion behavior and properties. Optical microscopy is used to quantify droplet size distributions for inclusion in the QSPR modeling framework.

4) Introduction to Gas Hydrate Formation and Mitigation

In the context of oil and gas operations, gas hydrates are crystalline structures that form when water and hydrocarbons come into contact at low temperatures and elevated pressures. The oil and gas industry currently spends millions of dollars annually on the mitigation and risk management associated with hydrates. The formation of these solid structures can lead to pipeline blockages that can result in ruptures and lost production. Avoiding the formation of these solid blockages is critical for maintaining sufficient production rates. Though hydrates have been researched for decades, there still remain significant technical challenges in managing and preventing hydrate blockage formation in upstream oil and gas operations. This presentation will focus on the background of gas hydrates, why they represent a significant challenge for the oil and gas industry, and recent advances toward improving our understanding and management of hydrates in upstream applications.

 

Biography:

Ashwin is a B.Tech, Chemical Engineering (2010-2014) from Anna University (Guindy campus), Chennai, India. He is pusuing his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering working on ‘Advanced Characterization of emulsions and hydrates in flowing conditions’. This project focuses on hydrate formation in emulsified system in flowing conditions with direct application to crude oil production. Further emulsion droplet size distribution, hydrate particle size distribution, hydrate adhesion to surfaces will also be quantified.

During his undergraduate he has undergone training at “Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC)” on oil and gas processing. He has also undergone training at Nuclear Desalination Demonstration Plant (NDDP), kalpakkam.

He spends his spare time by playing chess.

Webpage: https://aichele.okstate.edu/node/44

 

Kapil Gumte

PhD Graduate Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: AICHE, Salt Lake, Utah

Talk Title:

Mathematical Modeling of the Extracellular Matrix in Cancer Metastasis

Talk Abstract:

Metastatic cancer accounts for 90% of cancer deaths in the U.S. Early in metastasis, cancer cells detach from the primary tumor site and move through the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding the tumor into a blood vessel from which the cancer can spread throughout the body. The ECM is a composite tissue composed primarily of a network of macromolecules including insoluble fibers and fluid-filled pores. Normal ECM serves as a physical barrier to the movement of cells. Cancer cells manipulate the ECM through cellular signaling pathways that activate enzymatic remodeling of the structure of the ECM to facilitate cell migration. ECM remodeling leads to a spatially heterogeneous ECM that changes over time. However, the mechanism of ECM remodeling and the impact of ECM remodeling on physical properties that influence metastatic cell migration are not well understood (Lu, Weaver, & Werb, 2012). Experimental approaches alone cannot decouple the complexities of the many interacting processes during ECM remodeling. Thus, there is a critical need for alternative approaches to understand how ECM composition and structure are modified during metastasis and to determine if ECM properties may be restored to non-metastatic values. Computational models considering simultaneous physiological, chemical, and biomechanical interactions can be developed to enhance quantitative understanding of ECM remodeling in cancer.

In this work, we present a computational model to of ECM remodeling in the early stages of cancer metastasis. The model includes the dynamic reaction and diffusion processes involving ECM-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ECM-cross-linking lysyl-oxidase (LOX) and their impact on the collagen fibers in the ECM to predict ECM physical properties. This model improves upon existing models for the ECM in tumor metastasis by considering the transport variations due to the heterogeneous medium and the enzymatic reactions of both MMPs and LOX to both degrade and cross-link the ECM in tandem. The concentrations of the MMPs, LOX, and ECM basement membrane and interstitial collagen fibers are tracked with a mechanistic mathematical model that is solved computationally. The simulation results are assessed as to their ability to accurately predict stiffness changes due to ECM remodeling in the metastatic disease state as compared to published experimental data in the literature.

LU, P., WEAVER, V. M. & WERB, Z. 2012. The extracellular matrix: a dynamic niche in cancer progression. J. Cell. Biol., 196, 395-406.

 

Biography:

coming soon

 

Momen Amer

PhD Graduate Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: AICHE, Salt Lake, Utah

Talk Title:

Investigating the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG), and poly-L-lysine (PLL) molecular weights and grafting ratios on the physicochemical properties and the transduction efficiency of a PEG-PLL/ fiberless adenovirus vector targeting prostate cancer cells.

Talk Abstract:

Our goal was to develop a hybrid vector that provides advantages over both viral and non-viral vectors. For this purpose, we developed a vector formed of a fiberless adenovirus (Ad-FL), polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly-L-lysine (PLL), and an RNA aptamer that served as a targeting ligand for prostate cancer cells expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). The virus fiber, which is known to play a role in both virus tropism and initiating an inflammatory response and virus clearance, was replaced with the PEG-PLL grafted copolymer. This approach reduced the drawbacks associated with the fiber and provided advantages often associated with PEG, such as reduced immunogenicity and improved biodistribution. In addition, incorporating the PSMA targeting aptamer allowed for targeting prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA.

Biography:

I graduated from faculty of pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Egypt in 2006. I worked as TA in the Future university in Egypt from 2006 to 2008. Then I shifted to the pharmaceutical industry in 2009 where I worked for more than two uears as R&D specialist in pharmaceutical dosage forms formulations. In 2011 I joined RHein Minapharm Biogenetics, where I worked as R&D, then production Senior specialist, in upstream processing. in the mean time, I studied my M.Sc. and earned my degree in Biotechnology, form the American University in Cairo 2014. 

My M.Sc. was about identification of the critical cultivation parameters for scaling up the upstream for recombinant protein production from CHO cells. This work resulted in a 30% increase in the company products yield.
I am currently working in Dr. Ramsey lab. on designing new hybrid gene vectors that provide advantages over both viral and non­viral vectors with the goal of gaining a better understanding of how we may ultimately move beyond our current scope and design synthetic vectors with inherent efficiency rivaling those of a virus.
 
 
 
Ruaa Jasin Qader
 

PhD Graduate Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: SPE

Talk Title and Abstract: 

coming soon

Biography:
 

Has received bachelor degree in petroleum engineering from Baghdad University in Iraq. She has worked for the ministry of natural resources in Kurdistan Iraq for four years after which she chose to get trained and work for Kurdish fields area as petroleum and drilling engineer, and  I got the opportunity to work Schlumberger company for two years as designing oil field mud system. finally, Iraq government gave a scholarship to continue master degree in US.


 
 
Subarna Kole
 
 

Masters Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: AICHE, Southwest Process Technology Conference 2015

Talk Title:

Application of Microfluidics for Emulsion Characterization.

Talk Abstract:

This presentation focuses on the application of a custom designed microfluidics facility for emulsion formation and stability analysis. The experimental facility has a unique capability to produce controlled mono-dispersed and poly-dispersed oil-in-water and water-in oil emulsions. The experimental results indicating the effects of organic phase, aqueous phase salinity, salt type, total flowrate, and water-cut on the droplet size and emulsion separation kinetics in terms of temporal evolution of the sedimenting and coalescing interfaces will be discussed.

Biography: 

Subarna Kole received her Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from National Institute of Technology, Raipur (India) in 2014 and currently pursuing her Masters in Chemical Engineering from Oklahoma State University. She is working on her thesis project entitled ‘Application of Microfluidics for Emulsion Characterization’ under the guidance of Dr. Prem Bikkina. She is a recipient of the Graduate College top-tier fellowship for the academic year 2014-2015. Also, she moderated the Master’s Division of 2015 SPE Mid-Continent North American Regional Student Paper Contest. Currently she is acting as the social and media chair of Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Association (ChEGSA) at OSU where she is involved in the planning and organization of ChEGSA events.

 

Utkarsh Kapoor

PhD Graduate Student, School of Chemical Engineering, OSU

Conference: Oklahoma Supercomputing Symposium, 2015, Norman, OU

Talk Title:

Thermo-physical and Structural Properties of Imidazolium Based Binary Ionic Liquid Mixtures from Molecular Simulation.

 Talk Abstract:

Ionic liquids (ILs) are novel chemical substances composed entirely of ions. Unlike common salts, ILs can be synthesized to exist as liquid under ambient conditions. Many ILs do not evaporate and hence are dubbed as "environmentally friendly," making them attractive candidates for replacement of volatile organic compounds used in chemical industry. ILs are also known as "designer solvents," as their properties can be fine-tuned by varying the cations and anions independently. The number of such possible combinations can be increased dramatically by forming mixtures of ILs. In this presentation, we report the predictions of structural and thermo-physical properties, obtained by Molecular dynamics atomistic simulations of two binary ILs over a range of temperature. One of the binary mixtures contained the cation 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium [C4mim]+ while different mole fractions of chloride [Cl]- and methyl sulfate [MeSO4]- were investigated. Another binary IL mixture was composed of [C4mim]+ in combination with different mole fractions of [Cl]- and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [NTf2]- anions. The mixture behavior was quantified in terms of thermodynamic properties such as excess molar volume and excess residual enthalpy. The observed non-ideal behavior of IL mixtures will be explained in terms of three-dimensional probability plots of anion distributions around the cation [C4mim]+ and enhancement of local mole fraction suggesting the manner vicinity of cation and anion changes by change in composition. Also, transport properties like self-diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivity were predicted and reasoned based on ion pair correlated motion.

Biography:

Utkarsh Kapoor received his Bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering fromBirla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS) – Pilani, Rajasthan, India in 2012. Thereafter, he worked as Process Engineer in Grasim Industries Ltd.(chemical division), Aditya Birla Group (ABG) for a year and a half with focus on manufacturing caustic soda solution. He was also part of the plant commissioning team when initially he was stationed at ABG, sulphites division, Thailand. He has been pursuing Ph.D. program in School of Chemical Engineering at Oklahoma State University since fall 2014, with a special focus on predicting various properties of solvents such as ionic liquids using the power of computational simulations. He is a recipient of Halliburton Graduate Fellowship from OSU's College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology (CEAT), and is working as Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Scholar, having received a scholarship from OSU's Spears School of Business for academic year 2015-16. He also received the Graduate College top-tier fellowship for academic year 2014-15. He is also involved as Vice President of OSU Automation Society(OSUAS) and General Secretary of OSU's Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Association (ChEGSA), where he helps the team in planning and organizing various technical and social events.

Date: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 13:15